Tag Archives: featured

HAVE YOU GOT YOUR ART OF GROWING TREES BOOK YET?

Heartwood: The art and science of growing trees for conservation and profit

by Rowan Reid, Forest Scientist and the owner of the Bambra Agroforestry Farm. Publisher: Melbourn Books

“Encouraging landholders to plant and manage trees for conservation and profit”

AVAILABLE for $50 per copy from Tamar NRM.


This beautiful hard cover book has 15 chapters focusing on different high-quality timber species that Rowan grows on his own farm. These include the local Australian Blackwood and Mountain Ash, low rainfall native timber species like Red Ironbark and Spotted Gum, sub-tropical natives such as Sydney Blue Gum, Silky Oak, River Sheoak and Australian Red Cedar, and exotics including Coast Redwood, English Oak and Poplar.

Rowan uses these species to explore the fundamentals of tree growing and timber production and includes references to more than 100 timber species that Australian farmers could grow. Rowan highlights how, in almost every case, trees grown for timber can also provide soil conservation, biodiversity, agricultural and aesthetic values.

In October, Tamar NRM sponsored Rowan to come back to present on his 30 years as a tree grower.

AND . . . . We have a limited number of copies of his new book signed by Rowan Reid.

Also available from Petrarch’s Bookshop in Launceston.

More Information from Rowan’s Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/pg/agroforestry.net.au/posts/

Participate in the landholder pastures survey

 

Participate in the landholder survey and be in the running to win a John Deere 53cm toy tractor

Drawn end of November.

Tamar NRM is active in supporting initiatives to improve the profitability and the sustainability of farm enterprises in the Tamar Valley.

We are conducting a short survey to understand where the skills and knowledge of the region currently sits. We will repeat the survey in 3 years time.

As a producer you will be interested in improving pastures and the Meat and Livestock Australia Producer Demonstration Sites (MLA PDS) project as it progresses over a 3 year period.

Over the course of the MLA PDS project we invite you to attend field days, receive pasture improvement and management information that we develop as the project progresses and be involved by sharing your experience with a broader group of Tamar Farmers.

Knowledge and Skills Evaluation

There are two surveys a quick 15 minute 10 question online (SurveyMonkey) survey or a 17 question survey in a word document (about 20 minutes). By completing either survey you will go in the draw for the 53cm tractor.

Click here for the Word Document Survey

(17 questions, complete and email back to [email protected])

 

Click on the following link for the online survey (10 Question).

 

 

 

The survey is used to determine your level of understanding of pastures and pasture management. This knowledge and skills audit will allow us to track skill development and adoption of new practices.

The information will be completely confidential and individuals will not be identified in the interpretation or dissemination of the data.

We can also post you the survey if you prefer. An opportunity to do the survey over the phone also exists, just call Gregon the number provided below:

Greg Lundstrom on 6323 3310, Mob 0438 642 112

You will find the link to future Field Days on “EVENTS” tab –  http://www.tamarnrm.com.au/

Serrated Tussock Workshop at Hillwood

Thursday 30th November 2017, 10.00 to 11.30 – Hillwood Hall.

Come along and hear how landholders and agencies are dealing with infestations in the Tamar Valley, Learn how to recognise it and best management.

Bookings:

Phone: 6323 3310 or 0438 642 112 or

Email: [email protected]

LINK TO POSTER

IDENTIFICATION TIPS:

  1. Leaf bases of serrated tussock are more tightly packed and more slender than those of other tussocks and are never purple or blue-green, but a whitish colour.
  2. In summer when most other grasses have dried off to a straw-colour, the young serrated tussock plants still retain their bright green colour, except for the tips which are bleached.
  3. At the junction of leaf sheath and blade most grasses carry a small flap known as a ‘ligule’. In the case of serrated tussock this is white, papery, rounded at the tip and never hairy.
  4. The upward-pointing barbs on the leaf blade, which gives them their rough or serrated texture, are minute and almost invisible to the naked eye. If the leaves appear at all hairy, the plant is not serrated tussock.
  5. The seed head breaks off whole. The previous year’s seed heads do not generally remain on the plant.
  6. Flowering and seeding heads are a dark purple due to the colour of the two ‘glumes’ surrounding the seed.
  7. Seed of serrated tussock is unlike the seed of any of the other tussock grasses with which it is likely to be confused.
  8. For help in identifying serrated tussock, search the Dennis Morris Weeds and Endemic Flora Database for serrated tussock illustrations.

For more information view DPIPWE website:

http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/invasive-species/weeds/weeds-index/declared-weeds-index/serrated-tussock

or the Tamar Valley Weeds Strategy Website